The Self-Rescue Princess

Framed to Death CoverIt’s here…release day for Framed to Death. I hate picking a favorite (and I probably say this with every book) but I have to say this cover and the story is one of my favorites. It wasn’t the easiest one to write, to be honest it gave me huge fits at times, but it holds a special place in my heart. My character grew a lot from the ending of Embellished to Framed. I loved writing this journey for her and having her take on an issue causing havoc in her community.

I’ll be making some guest appearances around the world wide web, and I’ll also be at Malice Domestic this weekend. Please stop by and say hi at my stops to enter into a giveaway.

Here’s my schedule:

April 25 – Back Porchervations – REVIEW

April 26 – A Holland Reads – GUEST POST

April 27T’s Stuff – SPOTLIGHT

April 28The Girl with Book Lungs – REVIEW

April 29Tea and A Book – REVIEW, INTERVIEW

April 303 Partners in Shopping, Nana, Mommy, &, Sissy, Too ! – SPOTLIGHT

May 1Island Confidential – INTERVIEW

May 2LibriAmoriMiei – REVIEW

May 2Escape With Dollycas Into A Good Book – SPOTLIGHT

May 3Musings and Ramblings – GUEST POST

May 4A Chick Who Reads – REVIEW

And now a little introduction about Framed to Death:

Eden has turned into a hotspot of crime, and Faith finds herself smack dab in the middle of the flare-up. When a favor for a friend links Faith to the synthetic marijuana problem invading her town, no good deed goes unpunished becomes the title of her life. The town accuses the police of favoritism toward her, putting a strain between Faith and Ted, and a new officer is determined to prove Faith’s guilt.

When the criminal is outed, Faith’s relief is short-lived. A fire takes out the store—along with the suspected dealer—and she’s now number one on an officer’s suspect list. Faith sets out to prove her own innocence, and her digging sparks the truth to life. Instead of the truth setting the town free, Faith finds out it might destroy Eden, the friends she holds dear, and smother out her own life.

Buy Links:

Amazon

Barnes and Noble

iBooks

Kobo

 

pushed to the limit large banner640The Self-Rescue Princess is thrilled to have Emma Cassidy stopping by to chat with us today. Thanks for coming, Emma. I’ll go ahead and get started with my questions as I know you’re quite a busy woman.

PUSHED TO THE LIMITPlease tell us a little bit about what is currently going on in your life?

Hi, great to be here! I’m an event planner, and I’ve recently had to move back to my home town and start from scratch after my career went down the tubes in New York (through no fault of mine). In this business word of mouth is everything, so I wasn’t too happy when Faye Seymour, the town’s reigning gossip queen, spread some nasty rumors about me that resulted in me losing a valuable client. I wasn’t her only victim. Faye enjoyed digging up secrets, spreading malicious gossip, and making people’s lives miserable. But then someone finally snapped and pushed the old woman down the stairs. I happened to stumble upon her, and she accused me of trying to kill her before passing out! Fortunately, when she came around, she didn’t remember what she’d said. But now I have to find out who the real culprit is before she regains her ‘memory’ and starts accusing me again. Only problem is, Faye has made a lot of enemies.

What made you decide to take on such a risky endeavor?

I don’t want to be falsely accused. Plus, I’m convinced someone tried to kill Faye, and as much as she exasperates me, I wouldn’t like her to be bumped off.

Did you ever imagine yourself being involved in fighting crime?

No, never in my wildest dreams! It’s ironic that I lived in New York for years and never had a problem with crime, yet now that I’m back in my sleepy hometown I’m seeing potential murderers everywhere!

Who would you say is the least pleased about your additional career choice of amateur sleuthing? Or is detective work your only career?

That would have to be Owen Fletcher, my high school boyfriend. Once upon a time we were inseparable, but we each had very different visions of our future, so we broke up just before graduation. Now, I’m back, and I have to confess I’ve entertained the odd daydream about getting back together with Owen, but so far he hasn’t given me any signs of encouragement. Owen is a deputy with the sheriff’s department, and he hates my amateur sleuthing with a passion. He thinks I’m too reckless for my own good, but I don’t agree.

What are your strengths and weaknesses?

I think my strengths are resilience and self-reliance. Losing a business and a boyfriend at the same time has taught me how to recover from setbacks.

My weaknesses? Sometimes I can’t say no to people, like Faye, for example. Even though she lost me an important client and treats me with little respect, I’ve agreed to look after her pet parrot while she’s in hospital.

Describe what being a self-rescue princess (a strong, confident woman) means to you.

It means knowing that I am responsible for myself, and that no one owes me anything. It also means I recognize when something is too big for me to handle and that I’m not too proud to ask for help.

What one advice/wisdom would you like to pass onto young women?

I’d like to quote Eleanor Roosevelt: No one came make you feel inferior without your consent.

What was one lesson you learned during this challenging time in your life?

I’m lucky to have my family and friends around me.

If your story or life had a theme song, what would it be?

Let It Be, by the Beatles.

Do you plan on dabbling in amateur sleuthing in the future, or have you hung up your detective hat? 

Well, funny you should ask that! I don’t plan to dabble, but it seems like I’ve found myself embroiled in another murder mystery. I can’t give too much away because I’m still assembling the suspects, but hopefully all will be revealed soon.

 

dirty deedsStopping in to visit us today is Cameron James who you can get to know in Dirty Deeds. Welcome, Cameron, please tell us a little bit about what is currently going on in your life?

Answer: Being a justice dealer is becoming a bit unnerving, as all of my targets call me Avenging Angel. How do they all call me by that name and not know each other? It’s weird.

At the same time, Devin, my best friend, is keeping secrets and I have a bad feeling whatever he isn’t telling me is something I would kill anyone else over. How am I supposed to deal with that?

There’s a bartender named Cole who looks more like a cop than a bartender. He’s one of my targets, yet I don’t think he did what he’s accused of doing. All I can do is watch him and wait, meanwhile I’m returning the client’s money. It’s the least I can do since I’m not willing to kill an innocent man.

If all of that weren’t enough, my mentor is a bit twitchy lately. Granted, I’m not exactly what Onyx had hoped for when he decided to train me — he teaches vengeance and I prefer dealing justice. My unconventional morals could be interpreted as a slap in his face, which could mean a fight to the death if he feels I’m refusing his teachings in any way.

The stress level is high around here, but as long as I keep my eyes open I should be okay.

What made you want your story to be told?

Answer: The way I deal with justice may be illegal, but I have my own moral code and I care for those who need protection. I’m working toward redemption not just for me but for the innocents of my city. They deserve it. I deserve it.

In your life, what has empowered you?

Answer: Fighting skills and weapons at my side make me feel safe and empowered to handle any situation I come across. The only time I feel helpless is when Onyx is around because he is master of my skills and far exceeds my abilities. All the same, he won’t be around forever and once I can break free of him I’ll be my own master.

Describe what being a self-rescue princess (a strong, confident woman) means to you.

Answer: It means that I don’t have to put up with any stupid things a man decides for me. I’m my own person and I don’t have to wait for anyone to complete me or help me with anything. I don’t need rescuing — I do the rescuing around here.

What one advice/wisdom would you like to pass onto young women?

Aspire to rescue yourself over and over again. Never put yourself in a situation where you can’t pull yourself up and out. Give yourself the tools to learn and grow without needing a man beside you.

If your story had a theme song, what would it be?

Answer: Dirty Deeds, by AC/DC

 

 

 

death by trombone large banner updated640

death by tromboneI’d like to give JJ a warm welcome for stopping by the Self-Rescue Princess to chat with us. Please tell us a little bit about what is currently going on in your life? 

Life has been a little hectic, but when isn’t it? As if it weren’t enough to deal with my rotten ex-husband, and a teen-aged son in love, and all that stuff that schools do at the end of the year, we had a body behind the gym. I really tried to stay out of that, but then Chief Karlson arrested the music teacher, and we needed her to direct the band for graduation, and, well, you know how one thing leads to another. But really, I wasn’t interfering. I just stumbled into things.

What made you decide to take on such a risky endeavor?

Like I said, I didn’t “decide to take on” anything. I just kept stumbling over—I mean, into—things. It’s hardly my fault if people tell me things, and I can’t help thinking, can I?

Did you ever imagine yourself being involved in fighting crime?

Oh, sure. I mean, doesn’t every kid who ever read Nancy Drew and the Hardy Boys? I never actually expected it to happen to me, though. I mean, I moved to Pismawallops Island partly because it was such a quiet, safe place.

Who would you say is the least pleased about your additional career choice of amateur sleuthing? Or is detective work your only career?

Oh, that’s an easy one. I’ve been sort of seeing, well, not really dating or anything, but I’ve spent some time talking to—and he might’ve kissed me once or twice, too—Chief Karlson. The Police Chief. I’d have to say he’s not very happy about me asking questions and thinking about what he calls “police business.” I think he’s worried I’ll get hurt, which might make some sense, but I hurt myself worse all on my own, and anyway, I’m not a sleuth. I just like to know stuff.

What are your strengths and weaknesses?

I’m a very direct and straight-forward person. You get two-for-one there. I sometimes get into trouble because I’m not very good at tact and all that. But I go straight for the answers, and that’s helpful when you’re solving a problem. My son, Brian, insists that I add that it’s helpful when it doesn’t encourage people to try to kill you, and I suppose he has a point. And I like knowing things, which is healthy, right?

I don’t really like admitting I have any weaknesses. I’m just the same about not wanting to need help. But I guess I could say that I have a bit of a temper. Some might call that a fault.

Describe what being a self-rescue princess (a strong, confident woman) means to you.

That’s what I’m talking about, see? A strong, confident woman doesn’t need any help. Except I keep getting into situations where a bit of help comes in handy, but that’s just bad luck.

Okay, if I’m really honest, which I’d rather not be, but you’re pressing me here, I’d have to say that I’d love to know what a strong confident woman feels like, because I’m not, you know. My confidence got pretty well tromped on in the divorce, and Kitty would probably say in the marriage, too. I’m just trying to prove to myself and anyone who wants to know that I can manage on my own. I have a son who needs a mom, not a doormat, so I make the effort.

Do you plan on dabbling in amateur sleuthing in the future, or have you hung up your detective hat?

I have never planned on dabbling in sleuthing. In any case, I don’t dabble. I just do things. And I’ve promised Ron Karlson I won’t get involved. But, you know, things just seem to happen to Kitty and me. Things like dead bodies. So, there’s this awful man I was working for over the summer, and someone killed him, and since people had heard me say he was a bloviating windbag and a rather unpleasant character, I may need to do a little research to prove I wasn’t running around bashing people on the head…

 

Earlier this month I wrote about how I started making glass beads. If you missed that post, here’s a link: https://theselfrescueprincess.wordpress.com/2016/03/07/glass-bead-making-with-janice-peacock/

Today I want to write about the glass beads that I’ve been making in recent years, most of which look like small masks. If you’ve not watched the video on how to make a glass bead, here it is: link

When I make a glass bead, I melt long slender rods of colored glass in my torch, which runs on oxygen and propane and achieves temperatures in excess of 2000 degrees. Since I can’t touch the glass while it’s molten, I use tools to sculpt it in the flame. Many of the tool are things you’d find around your house (especially if you like scrapbooking): an Xacto knife, scissors, and tweezers. People often ask me if I get burned when I work in my studio making beads. Yes, I do, but usually those burns are mild—about what you’d expect if you touched a hot pan in the oven.

I’ve written and published two murder mysteries about a glass beadmaker named Jax O’Connell. The first is High Strung (Booktrope, 2015) and the second is A Bead in the Hand (Booktrope, 2015), both of which are available at all the major retailers. In the first book Jax becomes an amateur sleuth after she finds a dead body behind a bead store in Seattle.

J_Peacock_1 blog post 2Jax and I have some things in common—we are both glass beadmakers and are women of a certain age. But in most other ways we are different—for instance, Jax is fictional and I am not. Jax’s beads are made with bright colors and happy patterns. My beads, on the other hand, are fairly somber in color and look like they are old—like relics from an archeological dig or flotsam that has washed ashore. Jax is a relative newbie to the world of beads. Me? I’ve been creating lampworked beads for nearly 25 years.

In case you are curious: The word “lampworking” comes from a few hundred years ago when beadmakers didn’t have high tech torches and fuels like oxygen and propane. Instead, artisans used oil lamps and bellows to create flames that were hot enough to melt glass.

J_Peacock_3 blog post 2A lot of the beads I make look like small masks or stylized faces. I have several books about African masks that I like to look at for inspiration as well as a collection of masks from around the world. The faces I create are both human and animal forms. Typically, the eyes on the masks are closed. The closed eyes give these beads a peaceful feeling, and these days we can all use a little peace and tranquility in our lives.

I love making beads, and even though my time is now split between glass beadmaking and writing about a fictional glass beadmaker, I know that I’ll never give up the fun and excitement of lighting up my torch and melting glass.

You can see more of my glass work at http://www.janicepeacockglass.com and read about the books in the Glass Bead Mystery Series at http://www.janicepeacock.com.

Janice Peacock
Glass Artist and Author

J_Peacock_6 blog post 2

You can find me in all sorts of places on social media:
Facebook.com/JanicePeacockAuthor
Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest: JanPeac
Blog.janicepeacock.com

I had hoped to have a crafting blog post ready for today but it’s been hectic at the office this week and my hours work hours needing shifting around, so I didn’t have time to finish making my project. This month, I’ve celebrating National Craft Month by alternating between different hobbies: scrapbooking, crocheting, and coloring. I had thought about chatting about my experience with making a photo book through Shutterfly, but as we don’t have the book yet (and I did a scrapbooking post last week) I thought it better to wait.

CROPPED front smSince Cropped to Death is currently on sale for 99 cents for the Kindle, Nook, Kobo, and iBooks, I thought I’d share an excerpt of Faith preparing for a beginning scrapbooking class–and she gets interrupted.

Excerpt: 

I headed into the paper racks, weaving through the reds and yellows to reach the browns. The hues ranged from sand to a brown so dark it could pass for black. What shade and texture should I use tonight?

A smoother paper worked better for beginners, as it was easier for tearing and for making other embellishments, but I had no idea the skill level of the women signed up for the contest class and mini crop. A texture cardstock added an extra dimension to the work and gave the beginning layout a little edge. If using it for a border, tearing the texture paper added a nice jagged effect with feathering detail.

Maybe a sheet of both styles using a monochromatic scheme. That worked. A deeper beige mixed with a sand almost white shade. Neutrals worked well with any photos. I’d take a look at the students’ pictures when they arrived and pull complementary colors showcased in the photos.

Time to pick embellishments. I gathered up sheets of letter stickers in a variety of fonts and colors for the layout titles. I stopped in front of the clear stamps and picked out an alphabet set. I’d buy the stamps and share them tonight with the class. Hopefully, they’d love them so much, the two attendees would want a set for themselves. To save some money, I’d go with standard neutral paint colors. If the croppers wanted a hue with a little more pop, they could purchase it.

The bell above the door jangled. I took the items out of the basket and arranged them in piles on the tables. Before the crop started, I wanted to check on the amount of choices offered for the class participants. I snapped my fingers. Items for the prize basket.

A shadow fell over me. I jerked upright, and the wind whooshed in my ears even though I was inside. This fear issue was getting annoying. I hated feeling vulnerable. Taking in a deep breath, my heart rate slowed to normal as I realized a new customer, not a stalker, entered into the store.

A dark-haired woman in her late teens hovered behind me. Two splotches of red bloomed on her cheeks and she stammered. “I was wondering if. Well, if you could…would you mind…”

I smiled and waved my hand over the products on the table. “It’s not too late to sign up for the crop tonight.”

She pushed a piece of paper toward me. “I was wondering if…”

I held my pleasant smile and waited.

“If I could… like… get…”

The smile strained my cheeks.

“Your autograph.”

“My what?” I kept my reaction in check, uncertain if amusement or anger was more appropriate.

“Aren’t you the owners’ granddaughter? The one mentioned in the paper?”

I went with anger. Before the scolding exploded from my mouth, the young woman turned and fled out the door. Why couldn’t the store reach celebrity status because of our awesome customer service rather than because of murder?

I hope everyone has a wonderful Easter weekend, and is able to enjoy their families and their hobbies.

 

I hope everyone is enjoying National Craft Month as much as I am. Currently, I’m reading A Body in the Landscape by Larissa Reinhart, and this weekend I enjoyed three days of cropping at a local crop retreat sponsored by the Rotary Club. I was able to complete my daughter’s scrapbook album (a mix of pocket scrapbooking and traditional layouts) and also uploaded a bunch of pictures to Shutterfly and had them printed. I have two crops coming up in April and didn’t want to run out of photos to scrap at the events.

To continue with my monthly celebration of National Craft month is an brief excerpt from Fatal Brushstroke by Sybil Johnson.

fatal brushstrokeExcerpt: 

At home, too wired to sleep yet too tired to work, Rory pulled out the project Nora had given her and spread it out on the empty half of the kitchen table. Before painting on the final product, she wanted to practice the strokes spelling out Samantha’s name. She considered several styles of brush lettering, settling on one that was at the least elaborate end of the spectrum.

Rory drew guidelines on practice paper with a soft pencil, then loaded a flat brush with a fifty-fifty mixture of black acrylic paint and water. After painting the three strokes necessary to produce a capital S, she reviewed her work. She hadn’t lifted her brush quickly enough at the end of each stroke to produce the sharp edges she desired. She tried again, this time writing the full name several times, concentrating on correcting the strokes and keeping the spacing between the letters consistent. After covering two pages with the name, she gave up for the evening, still unhappy with the result. Her hands were too shaky from lack of sleep to produce the letters to her satisfaction.

Blurb:

A dead body in her garden and a homicide detective on her doorstep…

Computer programmer and tole painting enthusiast Aurora (Rory) Anderson doesn’t envision finding either when she steps outside to investigate the frenzied yipping coming from her own backyard. After all, she lives in Vista Beach, a quiet California beach community where violent crime is rare and murder even rarer.

Suspicion falls on Rory when the body buried in her flowerbed turns out to be someone she knows—her tole painting teacher, Hester Bouquet. Just two weeks before, Rory attended one of Hester’s weekend seminars, an unpleasant experience she vowed never to repeat. As evidence piles up against Rory, she embarks on a quest to identify the killer and clear her name. Can Rory unearth the truth before she encounters her own brush with death?

Right now, Fatal Brushstroke is on sale for 99 cents, and I don’t know how long the sale will last.

 

 

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Christina Freeburn

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